Who and what sells at NFT


The strangest use of the NFT token was shown by Injective Protocol.

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Not only artists but also media personalities have entered the crypto-art game.

 

Most sell their photos, pictures of their pets, and digital canvases. But there are more interesting offerings. You can see them on one of the best platforms, jupiterexchange.com

 

Musician The Weeknd sold an unreleased song in an NFT auction for $2 million. The lucky owner of the unreleased token received a track that will never be featured on any digital platform. DJ 3LAU went even further and sold an entire music album for $11.6 million.

 

Big companies and media didn't stay away either.

The New York Times sold a column with the telling title "Buy this column on the blockchain!" for $560,000. And the Saturday Night Live show made a clip on the subject - it went under the hammer for $360,000.

 

 It wasn't too long ago that digital shoes also appeared in NFT auctions.

Three pairs of sneakers that resemble Nike Air Force in design sold for $3.1 million. Technically, 621 people bought the sneakers - NFT technology allows everyone to buy a small portion of the object. Recently, the digital shoe was also released by Gucci.

A pair from this premium brand can be purchased for as little as $12, pennies compared to the prices of a physical model.

 

At NFT, you can sell anything, and the seller can be anyone. For example, a 12-year-old boy named Benjamin Ahmed sold a series of unpretentious badge works for $160,000. It is also possible to buy digital plots of land. Their prices can be equal to the value of real land.

 

The strangest use of the NFT token was shown by Injective Protocol. It bought Banksy's Morons (White) work for $95,000 and burned it during a broadcast on Twitter. After that Injective Protocol tied a non-interchangeable token to a digital version of the destroyed painting. The painting now exists only in digital form.

 

Well, perhaps the most surprising item sold is a regular gray pixel. Crypto-artist under the pseudonym of Park sold this work for $ 1.36 million at an auction at Sotheby's. For about an hour and a half, three collectors competed for it.

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