This eliminates the chromium content from the solid solution


This eliminates the chromium content from the solid solution

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Therefore, do not understand the use of these tables may produce the wrong results. They should be used with caution and only for preliminary assessment.Austenitic stainless steel are generally formed in bimetallic couple cathodes and are therefore not subject to corrosion. Austenitic stainless steel and zinc or aluminum contact may cause some additional corrosion in the latter two metals. It is less likely to be structurally significant, but the resulting white / gray powder can be considered unsightly. Bimetallic corrosion can be prevented by or from the details of the water that can be prevented or isolated from each other (for example,508mm Internal Diameter Printed PPGI Steel Coils by drawing a different metal contact surface) (by painting or tape attached to the assembly joint EG). Insulation around the bolts can be achieved by nonconductive plastic or rubber washers and nylon or polytetrafluoroethylene gaskets and bushings.

 

The system is a time-consuming detail that makes it at the scene, it is impossible to provide on-site inspection of the necessary scale to check all the washers and sleeves that have been properly installed.Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC)Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) requires simultaneous tensile stress and specific environmental factors. It is rare in the normal building environment. The stress does not require very high relative to the elastic stress of the material and may be due to loading and / or manufacturing processes such as welding or bending residual effects. When containing high residual stress stainless steel members (eg, due to cold working) for chlorine-rich environments (eg swimming pool cover, ocean, sea) should be cautious.General (uniform) corrosionFull corrosion is so serious for stainless steel than other steels.

It only occurs in stainless steel at pH When the austenitic stainless steel is heated between 450-850 and 0 ° C for a long time, the carbon in the steel diffuses into the grain boundary precipitates and chromium carbide. This eliminates the chromium content from the solid solution and leaves adjacent to the lower grain boundaries. Under this condition the steel is called "sensitized". Grain boundaries become easier for subsequent exposure prior to attack in a corrosive environment. When it occurs in the heat affected zone of the weldment, this phenomenon is called welding decay.Stainless steel grades with low carbon content (~0.03%) are not sensitized by arc processes (for rapid heating and cooling), even for plates up to 20 mm in thickness. In addition, the modern steelmaking process means that the carbon content of 0.05% or less usually reaches the standard carbon grades 304 and 316, so these grades are not prone to welding by arc welding process.