Does Hearing Aids Reduce the Risk of Demetia?


Does using hearing aids lower the risk of demetia? Yes, they can help improve cognitive abilities and QoL, but they are not the only solution to demetia. In fact, the study only included those who billed their insurance for hearing aid costs. But are they the right solution for demetia? Th

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Does using hearing aids lower the risk of demetia? Yes, they can help improve cognitive abilities and QoL, but they are not the only solution to demetia. In fact, the study only included those who billed their insurance for hearing aid costs. But are they the right solution for demetia? The answer is a mixed bag. The study looked at the costs of insurance-billed hearing aids, not those that were purchased over-the-counter.

Hearing aids reduce the risk of demetia

Using hearing aids has been proven to prevent dementia, according to a study conducted by the University of Exeter and King's College London. The PROTECT study included 25,000 individuals over 50. The results suggest that hearing aids can reduce the risk of dementia by up to 9%. Researchers are now looking at how to best use these tools to prevent the onset of dementia. In addition to preventing dementia, hearing aids may reduce the risk of depression and other problems, including Alzheimer's disease.

In a large French study, researchers followed nearly 3,800 subjects for 25 years. The results showed that those who did not use hearing aids had a higher risk of developing dementia. Interestingly, those who did use hearing aids had no higher risk. In addition, the study also found that hearing aids improved cognitive performance. This is particularly important as dementia is associated with a decline in memory. While the study only covered people with hearing loss, it is encouraging to know that hearing aid use is linked to improved cognitive performance and reduced risk of dementia.

They improve cognition

Hearing aids are associated with a decreased risk of incident all-cause dementia diagnosis in individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). These participants also experienced slower rates of cognitive decline than non-users. According to a measure of cognitive decline, the Clinical Dementia Rating Sum of Boxes (CDR-SB) score, hearing aid users had a slower rate of cognitive decline than non-users. Future studies should determine whether hearing aids are causally associated with lower rates of incident dementia.

The study also examined the influence of unmeasured covariates on the estimated HR for incident dementia. Among the MCI subjects who used hearing aids, the prevalence rates of the two types of dementia were 5%, 10%, and 20%. However, when the hearing aids were considered separately from the non-users, there was no significant association between hearing aid use and death. The results were similar in Group 1 and Group 2.

They improve QoL

Researchers have determined that hearing aids can reduce the risk of demetia and increase QoL. This has been shown by Brent (2018b) who used the GDS as a QoL measure in a CBA of Medicare eligibility. The findings are consistent with other previous studies. This study was conducted in Australia. Among the participants with demetia, hearing aids significantly reduced the risk of demetia and improved the QoL.

Despite these findings, many patients are reluctant to use hearing aids because of the social stigma associated with them. Psychosocial factors, such as perceived social stigma, can hinder the adoption of hearing aids. However, young patients are generally more receptive to hearing aids and report higher HRQoL. In addition, hearing aids reduce the impact of demetia on the patient's life and are associated with higher HRQoL.

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